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ENGL 495 ESM

Introduction

Hello everyone! My name is Crystal Jimenez and this is my ENGL 495 ESM blog. I’m currently a senior at CSUN and am looking forward to graduating at the end of the semester with a bachelors degree in English and a single-subject teaching credential.

As I begin my career as a teacher, I am learning how valuable tech ology can be in the classroom. One of the biggest impacts technology has made in my class is the ability to provide feedback to students almost instantly. When my students receive more feedback on their writing they are better able to revise and adjust their work, making them better writers.

I also notice that students are much more eager to participate in class when we use technology. It seems as though they don’t view using iPads as actual school work and they get excited to work together. The majority of my students are exceedingly able to use computers, smart phones, and tablets and enjoy learning through this new medium.

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Global Paper: Works Cited

Works Cited

Ngai, Pun and Yi, Xu. “Legal Activism or Class Action”. Special Issue of China

Perspectives, 2. 2011. 9-17. Print.

 

Sheehan, Matt. “A Day in the Life of a Muslim Chinese Migrant Family”. The World

            Post. Huffington Post, 16 Dec. 2004. Web. 12 Dec. 2016.

Final Course Blog Reflection

This course was much different than I thought it would be. While I imagined a “work-shop” style course and plenty of discussion and collaborative projects, I didn’t really know what exactly a senior seminar was supposed to be about. I guess I imagined the course would culminate a huge exam. I thought we would spend the entire semester working on preparing for this imagined exam and if I didn’t pass it at the end, then I wouldn’t graduate. I’m extremely grateful that there is no huge exam!

I remember that at the start of the semester we were all asked to consider the title of the course and explain what it meant. What is “Multi-Genre Literacy in a Global Context”? After having participated in the course, I feel better equipped to answer the question but I still don’t know if I’m right or wrong. To me, the class was about learning to be fluent in different genres in order to communicate more effectively across the world. We touched on communicating through poetry, through film, though digital media, and through informative writing. We studied the work of others and we created our own in effort to become fluent in as many “languages” as possible. I learned that I need to be able to take advantage of every means of communication possible because the way we communicate has evolved dramatically. In order to stay relevant, in order to be an effective teacher, I need to be able to use different forms of media to communicate. I also need to be able to show my students how to do the same.

One of the most effective components of this course, for me, was the blog. Having to post my work to a public forum was one of he best ways for me to understand the power of global communication. I admit that I haven’t seen much traffic on the site. I haven’t made an inspiring connection with a reader from another country. But the thought that someone as far away as China or India could be reading my work and be inspired to reach out to me is excited and motivating. I enjoyed entertaining the idea that the possibilities for connection were so much more vast now that my work was displayed on a public forum. In fact, I went out and researched some safe options for my students to do the same. The website Figment.org is a really great tool for students to use in similar way that we used the blogs. Students from across the U.S. can publish various genres of their own writing and receive feedback from others who have profiles on the site.

When I told my students that people from New York, Boston, or Chicago could be reading their work, they changed very quickly. I saw the quality of their work improve measurably and I noted that they were much more focused and precise. It’s amazing that the simple thought of new people interacting with our work can have such a noticeable effect on our efforts.

I really enjoyed this course. I’m glad that I had no idea what to expect when I starts and I’m grateful that I found tools to take out to my students to teach them new ways of communicating. Thank you!

Global Paper: Final Draft

Crystal Jimenez

Professor Wexler

ENGL 495 ESM

December 13, 2016

Working Without A Wage: Chinese Laborers and Their Struggles

Sitting her in in Southern California, here in the Unites States, China couldn’t feel further away. However, the struggles faced by China’s working class are closely connected to those of us living in the U.S. As many people who live in the U.S. feel, the people who make up China’s working class are tired, frustrated, and ready to fight back for their rights and respect. Matt Sheehan’s article ,“A Day in the Life of a Muslim Chinese Migrant Family”, explores the particular struggles of a specific group of Chinese citizens but also shines a light on how the evolving landscape of China’s largest cities creates a revolving door for the poorest citizens, pushing them through repeating cycles of work without offering any opportunity for forward mobility.

At the start of the article Sheehan introduces the Mao family, made up of two parents and three children. The three children are Baolong, the fourteen-year-old son, Fang Fang, the nineteen-year-old daughter, and Yufang, a second daughter. They all, with the exception of Yufang, work together in this restaurant, which is “a family business through and through, funded by family savings and operated by everyone”(Sheehan). These long working hours leave little time for the family to go out and enjoy the fruits of their labors. They don’t have time to leave the restaurant to stroll around the city or visit with family or friends. They also don’t get time to shop or spend money and participate as consumers in China’s economy. Sheehan laments, “It’s a grueling schedule, with the only benefit being that no one has time to reflect on how grueling it is” (Sheehan). With all the work being dedicated to this business, what benefit lies ahead for this family? There is no hope for expansion, no savings, no free time, and nothing to pass down to the next generation.

Our most recent political race revolved around the economy of the U.S. The candidates harped constantly about “small business owners” who are the backbone of this country. Looking at China, it might be easy to transfer this train of thought onto the Mao’s. In fact, Sheehan explains, “A Silicon Valley denizen might describe the Mao family as ‘serial entrepreneurs’. They’ve opened and closed about half a dozen restaurants in different cities. The current location is their third in Beijing. The previous two were bulldozed to make way for new construction, and this one will almost certainly meet the same fate” (Sheehan). However, while the Mao’s toil daily in their small business, their prospects are not as bright as those who make their way into Silicon Valley. They, the Mao’s, understand that they will never have millions of dollars or luxuries beyond their imaginations. They know that they will work for the rest of their lives.

Interestingly, Sheehan explains the symbiotic relationship the Mao’s have with their consumer base. He writes, “The restaurant’s patrons are primarily men who work with their hands; construction crews, delivery men and self-employed mechanics” (Sheehan). The family makes a living off of feeding the same construction workers whose work continues to put the Mao’s out of business. The construction crews come into towns from rural areas, tear down buildings, and build up news ones. As they work, they move closet and closer the area where the Mao’s have set up their business and have no choice but to wait until the crews get there. They won’t leave for two reasons, the first being that no matter where they go, they already no it will only be a matter of time before the crews catch up, but the second being that they their business exists to serve these workers. They’ll go where the construction crews go because that is where the work it. At least until there is nowhere left to house their business. That is where the cycle ends for the Mao’s.

Pun Ngai and Xu Yi wrote the article “Legal Activism or Class Action? The Political Economy of the ‘No Boss’ and ‘No Labour Relationship’ in China’s Construction Industry”, which examines how the peasant working class has found themselves in China’s largest cities. They discuss the fact that, in the rural areas of China, workers are recruited to come work in the cities to construct new buildings. However, much like the Mao’s, who work without seeing any forward mobility, these workers do their jobs and later find that they will not be paid and nor do they have to be. Ngai and Yi explain, “Construction workers are well aware of the exploitative nature of the labour subcontracting system, because it often results in wage arrears and lack of compensation for bodily injury”(2). In their article the authors explain the “no boss” and “no labour relationship” as the culprit of the injustices these workers face. However, these two groups of workers, the Mao’s and the construction workers whom the Mao’s rely on, are both facing the reality that no matter how hard they work, they will not see a change in their lives.

This message is being echoed across the United States as well, proving that if we listen, we can appreciate that we are all close than we think.

Multimedia Project: Podcast

Here is a link to the Multimedia Project Presentation

https://docs.google.com/a/my.csun.edu/presentation/d/1YASjxl4Uvjr2YgaMrNhur9iwNoGnXGBG2wYYEc3XqiM/edit?usp=sharing

Collaborative Film Project

Here is the link to the Collaborative Film Project Presentation

https://docs.google.com/a/3pop.com/presentation/d/1mnf7IMblEGxG8Yp5lRXATQDGRKLMEjIvOqFf6L2Vbrk/edit?usp=sharing

Reflection- Week 8 Presentations Continued

Today was the second round of presentations from the Collaborative Film Project. I’ll admit that I was frustrated with the way the class way run today. The group that went before my group took over an hour to present their project. Even after they were informed of the fact they went over their time and we took a break, they still came back up after the break to continue presenting. I have an issue with this for two reasons. The first reason is that, no matter how interesting their presentation may have been, it was extremely difficult to sit there and listen to them talk for over an hour. I know that the syllabus specified the presentation should be about 30 minutes, which I imagine was so that everyone had time to present and that they presentations were succinct and to the point. Even if I wasn’t part of the part that had to follow that incredibly long presentation I would have been frustrated. It just doesn’t make any sense to me to allow a group to go on for so long just because they wanted to.

The second reason I was frustrated was because my group had to follow the presentation and if we wanted to take as much time as the previous group to present, we couldn’t because the class was going to end in about 45 minutes. I had to rush through my own presentation because I didn’t feel there was enough time left in the class for me to comfortably discuss the film we chose.

Reflection: Week 6- Collaborative Film Presentation

The Collaborative Film Presentation was one of my favorite assignments from this semester. I haven’t ever taken a class where we made or analyzed different films that weren’t adaptations of books we were reading. I think that is why I liked this assignment so much. My husband and I always like to discuss the movies we watch after we see them and this assignment felt like one of those discussions. I also liked that we used Nichols’ book as a guide because otherwise I’m not sure I would’ve known how to go about analyzing film. The chapter really helped me focus on certain aspects of the film so as to clearly form an argument.

While I would like to take credit for coming up with the movie we worked on, it was my teammates who realized that Super Bad fit our chapter so well. Luckily I had an excellent team surrounding me for this assignment and the planning period was easy.

Reflection: Week 5- Poetry Slam

Today’s class was a really fun one. I enjoyed listening to the different poems written by my peers. It was a nice change of pace from a busy week to be able to sit and admire the creativity of my friends. I really liked one of the poems Marley shared. I think it was called “Miss”. I can relate to the frustration of having students refuse to call me by my name and instead refer to me as “miss”. I thought her poem was a great way to relieve some of that frustration. I can also see her poem as being useful as a tool in the classroom as a model for writing poetry and as a kind reminder that we are people with names too!

It had been such a long time since I had written creatively, so I admit that I was nervous about writing the poetry in the first place, and particularly nervous about reading it out loud in front of the class. I chose to write from a place of sadness and vulnerability, which helped me work through some things. I was actually incredibly embarrassed when I started crying in front of everyone. I kind if wish I hadn’t chosen to write about something so personal. Sadly, my dog passed away two weeks after I wrote the poem about her being sick. Ultimately, I am glad I decided to write the poem. I feel as though it would have been even harder for me to deal with her passing had I not written about some of that pain beforehand.

Global Essay: Partial Draft

(Incomplete)

Crystal Jimenez

Professor Wexler

ENGL 495 ESM

December 5, 2016

Working Without A Wage: Chinese Laborers and Their Struggles

Matt Sheehan’s article ,“A Day in the Life of a Muslim Chinese Migrant Family”, explores the particular struggles of a specific group of Chinese citizens but also shines a light on how the evolving landscape of China’s largest cities creates a revolving door for the poorest citizens, pushing them through repeating cycles of work without offering any opportunity for forward mobility.

At the start of the article Sheehan introduces the Mao family, made up of two parents and three children. The three children are Baolong, the fourteen-year-old son, Fang Fang, the nineteen-year-old daughter, and Yufang, a second daughter. They all, with the exception of Yufang, work together in this restaurant, which is “a family business through and through, funded by family savings and operated by everyone”(Sheehan). Discuss the long work hours of the family. “It’s a grueling schedule, with the only benefit being that no one has time to reflect on how grueling it is” (Sheehan). With all the work being dedicated to this business, what benefit lies ahead for this family? No expansion, no savings, no free time, and nothing to pass down to the next generation.

“A Silicon Valley denizen might describe the Mao family as ‘serial entrepeneurs’. They’ve opened and closed about half a dozen restaurants in different cities. The current location is their third in Beijing. The previous two were bulldozed to make way for new construction, and this one will almost certainly meet the same fate” (Sheehan).

“The restaurant’s patrons are primarily men who work with their hands; construction crews, delivery men and self-employed mechanics” (Sheehan). The family makes a living off of feeding the same construction workers whose work continues to put the Mao’s out of business. The construction crews come into towns from rural areas, tear down buildings, and build up news ones. As they work, they move closet and closer the area where the Mao’s have set up their business and have no choice but to wait until the crews get there. They won’t leave for two reasons, the first being that no matter where they go, they already no it will only be a matter of time before the crews catch up, but the second being that they their business exists to serve these workers. They’ll go where the construction crews go because that is where the work it. At least until there is nowhere left to house their business. That is where the cycle ends for the Mao’s.

Pun Ngai and Xu Yi wrote the article “Legal Activism or Class Action? The Political Economy of the ‘No Boss’ and ‘No Labour Relationship’ in China’s Construction Industry”, which examines how the peasant working class has found themselves in China’s largest cities. They write, “”

 

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